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What Is Plagiarism?: Learn to Avoid It

Is It Plagiarism?

Putting an idea that you found in a source into your own words without mentioning where you got the idea.

Is It Plagiarism?
Yes, it's plagiarism.: 873 votes (83.7%)
It's not plagiarism, but it's still cheating.: 73 votes (7%)
It's not plagiarism because ideas can't be copyrighted.: 97 votes (9.3%)
Total Votes: 1043

"How Can I Avoid Plagiarism!?"

There is a very simple way to avoid plagiarism: ALWAYS credit the sources of the facts, ideas, and words you use in your writing.

In fact, there is an exception. You are not required to cite a source for "common knowledge" -- those things everyone knows.

However, if you are in doubt about whether something you saw in a source is common knowledge, CITE IT! "Better safe than sorry" is the rule to follow.

The resource pages included below include some very useful tools that will help you cite any source you use and, therefore, avoid plagiarism.

Online Tutorials for Avoiding Plagiarism

MLA Style Guide for Citations

Click on the link to open MLA Style Guide for Citations in a new tab: https://library.hccs.edu/mla-guide .

Snapshot of MLA Style Guide

Chicago Style Guide for Citations

Click on the link to open APA Style Guide for Citations in a new tab: https://library.hccs.edu/Chicago_style.

Snapshot of Chicago Style guide

APA Style Guide for Citations

Click on the link to open APA Style Guide for Citations in a new tab: http://library.hccs.edu/apa .

Snapshot of APA Guide

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